Mirena Poster

Dr Diana Mansour answers your questions

  • Can a long acting contraceptive be used during breast-feeding?
    vid-0
    /html/flash/Question33.flv
Read video transcript

Breastfeeding

If you have recently given birth you may be concerned about using a long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) while breastfeeding. However, there’s no need to worry as the contraceptives featured on this website are safe to use soon after giving birth1,2,3,4.

Intrauterine system (IUS)

There appear to be no negative effects on infant development or growth when using the intrauterine system six weeks after childbirth, which is the earliest that it should be placed after having given birth1.
Note: The intrauterine system (IUS) is also known as the ‘hormonal coil’.

Intrauterine device (IUD)

There appear to be no negative effects on infant development or growth when using the intrauterine device six weeks after childbirth, which is the earliest that it should be placed after having given birth2.
Note: The intrauterine device (IUD) is also known as ‘the coil’.

Contraceptive implant

Although a small amount of the etonogestrel passes into breast milk, studies have not shown any negative effects on the production or the quality of breast milk, nor on the growth and development of the child3. If you are breastfeeding and want to use the implant, ask your healthcare professional for further advice.

The implant should be placed at the earliest from four weeks after giving birth if you are breastfeeding, or 21 to 28 days after having given birth if you are not breastfeeding3.

If you are breastfeeding and want to use the implant, ask your healthcare professional for further advice.

3-monthly contraceptive injection

Although some progestogen (hormone) can pass into breast milk, there is no evidence that it does any harm to breastfed infants. However, you should not be given your first contraceptive injection until at least six weeks after having given birth4.